Tag Archives: telescope

FAST completed

Time rolls by. When I wrote New Eyes on the Universe I pictured FAST – the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope – as an instrument for the mid-term future. Construction of the telescope began in March 2011 but I thought its remote location in a karst sinkhole in Guizhou Province, combined with the technical difficulty of operating such a large device, would cause innumerable delays. In September 2016, however, the telescope saw first light. Chinese scientists are now calibrating the telescope, and by 2019 it should be doing astronomy.

FAST is a staggering telescope. It consists of 4450 triangular reflecting panels that combine to form a collection area more than twice as large as the famous 300m Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. If it works to its design specifications, FAST will be twice as sensitive as Arecibo, observe three times more sky than Arecibo, and be able to survey the sky 5–10 times faster than Arecibo.

Such a vast instrument has the potential to make a number of discoveries in pure astronomy, but a further intriguing possibility lies in its use for SETI: scientists interested in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence will be able to “piggyback” on pure science projects and comb the data for signals.

FAST

FAST lies in a natural basin in the Guizhou Province of China. The telescope is undoubtedly an impressive astronomical instrument, but its name is a slight misnomer: although the reflector diameter is 500m only a 300m diameter circle is used at any one time. (Credit: Asianewsphoto)