Tag Archives: Kepler-438b

Kepler’s latest haul

The Kepler mission continues to astound. In May 2013 it suffered a malfunction that ended its primary mission: the spacecraft needs three reaction wheels in order to point its telescope with accuracy, and when the second of four such wheels failed the mission was over. However, a team of scientists and engineers developed a method for using the pressure of sunlight as a third “virtual” reaction wheel: the method works (albeit with reduced capabilities and with the need for a prodigious amount of signal analysis). Kepler is back in business.

In December 2014, astronomers announced that Kepler had spotted a new planet (HIP 116454b), a discovery that was subsequently confirmed by other telescopes. HIP 116454b is a super-Earth: it has about 12 times the mass of Earth and is about 2.5 times larger. It orbits close to a K-type orange dwarf. (The Allen Telescope Array has observed this planet, looking for signals in the range 1000 to 2250 MHz.  It didn’t hear anything.)

And further analysis of existing pre-malfunction Kepler data has taken its tally of exoplanet discoveries past 1000. The latest batch includes the most Earth-like planet found to date: Kepler 438b is just 12% larger than Earth.

Kepler continues to produce surprises!