More hints of the Higgs

In December 2012 the ATLAS and CMS teams at the Large Hadron Collider announced that they had seen signals that were consistent with there being a Higgs boson with a mass somwhere in the region of about 124-126 GeV. Statistically, though, they were unable to claim a discovery.

Before Fermilab’s Tevatron collider ceased operations in September 2011 its two experiments – CDF and DZero – generated vast amounts of data that have only now been analysed. On 7 March 2012, scientists announced the results of that analysis at the Rencontres de Moriond conference. The data hint at a Higgs boson with a mass somewhere in the range 115-135 GeV. Again, the statistics fall far short of that required to claim a discovery.

The Tevatron collider at Fermilab, as seen from the air.

The Tevatron collider at Fermilab, as seen from the air. The main ring and main injector are clearly visible. The ponds are there to dissipate waste heat from the machine.
Credit: Fermilab, Reider Hahn

This is tantalising! The ATLAS and CMS teams both make use of high-energy proton-proton collisions produced by the LHC, but they are quite different experiments focusing different things. The CDF and DZero experiments are different again: the Tevatron produced proton-antiproton collisions. So a variety of signals are pointing to a Higgs with a mass somewhere around 125 GeV. But there’s no certainty that it’s there: further data might cause the signal to vanish like the Cheshire Cat.

One thing is certain: by the end of 2012 we will know whether the Higgs exists and, if it does, what its mass is. The LHC is operating so well that there’s now nowhere left for Higgs to hide.