LHC finds the Higgs boson

Today’s announcement at CERN, that the CMS and ATLAS experiments have found a boson consistent with the Standard Model Higgs, is the most exciting find in particle physics since … well, since I can remember. The discovery of charm was before my time, but I was a physics student when news of the W and Z discoveries was made public and I don’t believe those announcements matched today’s press conference for drama and sheer emotion (Peter Higgs had to wipe away a tear).

This is a tremendous day for science. Just think what’s happened here. Over a period of decades, theorists and experimentalists developed a theory of the basic interactions (electromagnetism, weak force, strong force) that govern the behaviour of the fundamental particles (quarks, neutrinos, electron, muon and tau). But in order for the theory to match the observed fact that the fundamental particles have mass, theorists had to add something else into the mix. They used purely mathematical reasoning to deduce something incredible about the Universe: that it’s filled everywhere with a scalar field — the so-called Higgs field. It’s the interaction with this field that gives the fundamental particles mass.

And decades after theorists postulated the existence of this field, CMS and ATLAS have found evidence for the associated boson. They saw hints of the Higgs boson last year. Now it’s definite. It has a mass of around 125 GeV.

This is tremendous news for CMS, ATLAS, CERN and science in general. And it’s the start of a whole new era in physics. Now we know where the Higgs is, the LHC — such a tremendous machine — will be able to investigate its properties in detail. And perhaps for the first time we’ll get a glimpse beyond the Standard Model.

What a great day!