The Edge of the Sky, by Roberto Trotta: A book review

Last month I finished a first draft of an article about AMS-02 for the Yearbook of Astronomy 2016. (As I write this, 2016 seems a long way away – but the lead time for this volume is long and, besides, I have other writing commitments this year. I wanted to get a draft version out of the way while I had chance.) The target audience for the Yearbook consists of amateur astronomers – people who are deeply interested in astronomy and cosmology but who don’t necessarily have a scientific or mathematical training. Much of my article, therefore, is taken up by explaining the meaning of various technical words and phrases – “positron fraction”, “neutralino annihilation”, “primordial antimatter” and so on. Even the name of the experiment – Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer – requires explanation. It took me several thousand words to explain why Sam Ting and his AMS might, or might not, have seen something of great scientific interest.

When I heard that Roberto Trotta had written The Edge of the Sky – a book about cosmology using only the thousand most frequently used English words – I thought he must either be barking mad or else a member of the Oulipo (you know, those authors who decide to write novels while blindfolded and using only letters that appear on the left-half of a keyboard, or something equally arbitrary and constraining). I thought it would be a disaster. It turned out to be one of the most charming, fresh and inventive books of popular science that I’ve read.

In Trotta’s book, the Milky Way becomes the White Road, electrons are referred to as Very Small Drops and antimatter becomes Sister Drops. (So I guess the positron, which I write about in my Yearbook article, would be the Sister Drop of the Very Small Drop.) These and other word choices are wonderful and lead to a surprising clarity of expression.

But is it really possible to describe the complexity of modern science using this approach. Well, I tried to explain the importance of AMS-02 using polysyllabic words to replace other, more technical, polysyllabic words. In The Edge of the Sky a space-based detector such as AMS-02 becomes a flying Far-Seer in the sky. The heroine of Trotta’s book wonders whether dark matter will first show up in such a flying Far-Seer in the sky or in one of the big ears in the rock (in other words, one of the multitude of underground detectors such as LUX or DAMA), in the huge eye in the ice (the IceCube Neutrino Observatory) or in the Big Ring in the ground (the Large Hadron Collider). This approach is possible. It works, and it works beautifully.

The experience of reading The Edge of the Sky is strange and rather hypnotic. I think everyone can learn something from it. This book is a must-read. (A sentence that uses the 28th, 455th, 13th, 85th, 88th and 317th most-used English words according to Project Gutenberg.)